ACTA COMMENTARY on THE SUNDAY LECTIONARY

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER  

YEAR B: YEAR OF MARK    Download here >>> Fifth Sunday of Easter Year B

To get a grip on John’s Gospel is a work of rich reward, and a work of blood, sweat and tears.  Our Lectionary compilers decided not to have a four year cycle of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.  Readings from John are confined to bit parts scattered throughout the other three years. So we do not hear John’s Gospel over a considerable period and there is less time to come to embrace its profound teaching.

ACTA COMMENTARY 
OUR SUNDAY LECTIONARY
FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER  
YEAR B: YEAR OF MARK
 
GOOD SHEPHERD SUNDAY      Download >>> Fourth Sunday of Easter - Year B
 
The Fourth Sunday of Easter is called Good Shepherd Sunday because the Gospel reading portrays Jesus as the Good Shepherd.  It is customary on this day, in our reflection on the Gospel reading, to direct our thoughts to vocations to priesthood and religious life.  Jesus who proclaims ‘I am the Good Shepherd’ is seen as a model for all who are called to undertake shepherding rôles in every church community throughout the world.  Today couragement to serve in such callings will find its way into homilies and congregations will be urged to pray for vocations.   

Bishop Paul Swarbrick, the seventh Bishop of Lancaster was installed on Monday 9th April and gave this address. The sound he refers to is the smoke alarm that went off, as it always does, when incense is used ! The Cathedral was packed and the Joy was palpable. He will make a very good listening, collaborative and pastoral Bishop.

 

ACTA COMMENTARY ACTA COMMENTARY OUR SUNDAY LECTIONARY
SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER   YEAR B: YEAR OF MARK      Download: Second Sunday of Easter (Divine Mercy Sunday)

The Easter Sunday morning Mass last week featured a Gospel reading which is to be read on each Sunday in the three year cycle.  That Gospel begins with the story of Mary Magdalene’s meeting with the Risen Lord.  In the darkness of the very early morning she came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been rolled away.   She ran to Simon Peter and “the other disciple” - and there her story is suspended and we are provided with an account of the experience of the two men.  It is a very enriching story of the readers/hearers but ends in a most extraordinary sentence - so bewildering that our Lectionary omits it.   Having discovered an empty tomb and no sign of the body of Jesus, they speculate as to the meaning of the folded burial cloths, and then,

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